You can listen to Noah Filipiak’s “Behind the Curtain” Podcast interview with Tyler St. Clair on the Podbean Player below or you can subscribe to all “Behind the Curtain” Ministry Podcast episodes on iTunes. (Podcast listening tip: use the podcasts app on your smartphone and listen while driving, doing chores, or working out)


Two years ago, Pastor Tyler St. Clair was interviewed in Episode 17 of the Behind the Curtain Ministry Podcast, discussing what it was like to gear up for his urban church plant in Detroit and what it was like to do fundraising as a black pastor.  Today, Noah Filipiak catches back up with Pastor Tyler to see what actually planting and pastoring has been like after all the hype has died down.  The two church planters talk about life in the trenches of pastoral / church planting ministry and about how important it is to keep realistic and biblical expectations as a pastor.  Tyler also discusses the Contend Conference, coming up in Detroit on February 28th.

Tyler on Twitter

Tyler on Facebook

Tyler on Instagram

Tyler’s Blog

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The Lord of the Rings story comes to a climax in the final battle at Mordor as the forces of good square off against the seemingly insurmountable forces of evil. The king Aragorn, the dwarf Gimli, the elf Legolas and the wizard Gandalf represent the best and strongest warriors for good in Middle Earth. These heroes cluster with their followers in the middle of a plain, while countless foes of darkness close in around them. For every one hero, there seem to be a million enemies.

This is the type of scene that comes to mind for Christian men seeking to fight off the temptations of living in an oversexualized world. Most men are taught simply to be better warriors—better Gandalfs, Aragorns, Legolases, and Gimlis. Well-meaning advisors and “experts” teach men how to try harder, think better, manage behavior through mental tricks, and even physically beat themselves into submission. The problem is, no matter how strong the hero in the middle, the enemy continues its barrage with no end in sight. Continue Reading…

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I read Hebrews 2:14-18 yesterday.  Read it slowly, out loud, a few times:

Since the children have flesh and blood, he too shared in their humanity so that by his death he might break the power of him who holds the power of death—that is, the devil— and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by their fear of death. For surely it is not angels he helps, but Abraham’s descendants.  For this reason he had to be made like them, fully human in every way, in order that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in service to God, and that he might make atonement for the sins of the people. Because he himself suffered when he was tempted, he is able to help those who are being tempted.

I am a person who struggles mightily with depression and anxiety. It comes and goes and is subject to a diverse array of stimulus.  I also have a lot of good ways of coping with it, which are sometimes enough to feel better and sometimes aren’t.

Usually when we think of Jesus’s atonement, we think of him as the substitute for our sins. We deserve a penalty for our sins, hell, and Jesus took that hell upon himself on the cross so we wouldn’t have to take it on ourselves for all eternity.  Then when the Judge looks at us, we are declared innocent (righteous). Not because of what we’ve done, but because of what Jesus did on our behalf.

All of this is true, praise be to God! But something even deeper hit me yesterday. Continue Reading…

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Men, here are 4 reasons you should NOT read Beyond the Battle: A Man’s Guide to His Identity in Christ in an Oversexualized World by Noah Filipiak:

1. You don’t struggle with lust at all.  You never check out attractive women when they walk by.  You don’t have any desire to look at internet porn or nudity in TV shows and movies.
2. You do lust, look at porn, watch Game of Thrones, etc. but you don’t think it’s a sin and you don’t have a problem with it.
3A. You are completely content in your marriage. Your wife is the definition of perfection in every way.  You never wish she would change anything or act differently.
3B. You are completely content in your singleness.  You never struggle with God about why you aren’t married.
4. Because Noah Filipiak is not a celebrity, and you know that only celebrities have good or helpful things to say.

If any of these apply to you, make sure you do NOT click on the following link: Beyond the Battle: A Man’s Guide to His Identity in Christ in an Oversexualized World by Noah Filipiak

 

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You can listen to Noah Filipiak’s “Behind the Curtain” Podcast interview with Kent Carlson on the Podbean Player below or you can subscribe to all “Behind the Curtain” Ministry Podcast episodes on iTunes. (Podcast listening tip: use the podcasts app on your smartphone and listen while driving, doing chores, or working out)

Noah Filipiak interviews Kent Carlson on what led him and his team to shift the seeker-driven megachurch he founded into a church of spiritual formation. A shift that led to around 1500 people leaving the church. Kent is the co-author of Renovation of the Church, a book that chronicles the journey of Oak Hills Church and its leadership. He was mentored by Dallas Willard and currently serves as Vice President of Leadership Formation for the North American Baptist denomination.

Connect with Kent on Twitter

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